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Guidance on Restarting your Business After Lockdown

Guidance on Restarting your Business

As the lockdown restrictions begin to lift across the UK, it has become more and more clear that different sectors are moving at different paces when it comes to reopening businesses safely, in addition to the fact that all four countries are not issuing the same guidance.

At this time, many businesses are excited at the prospect of being able to reopen following 13 weeks of lockdown. However, this excitement should not dilute the importance of businesses only opening when it is safe to do so, both for employees and members of the public. Their duty of care is as important as it ever has been.

Our recent bulletin went into detail around the risk control measures and guidance on how to work safely, with practical guidance around working safely when re-opening businesses.

Sector-specific guidance for restarting your business after lockdown

In addition to the general health and safety obligations businesses have, there are also sector-specific considerations that need to be taken into account. As a result, our insurer partner Allianz has produced sector specific guidance around re-starting businesses, taking into account the different considerations that each sector will have.

Here you can see their tailored guidance for sectors.

Motor fleet

  • Customer process
  • Review pick-up, drop-off and collection and delivery points and timings with customers
  • Restrict the number of people involved in loading and unloading of vehicles
  • Ensure drivers have access to appropriate welfare facilities
  • Consider use of pre-booking systems where instructions, capacity limitations and specific timings are communicated by phone or electronically
  • Avoid drivers having to accommodate paper or cash, with contactless or remote transactions used where practical
  • Review arrangements for refuelling of vehicles, recognising the touch points involved and the need for personal protective equipment (disposable gloves for example)

Vehicles

Review arrangements for social distancing, including in vehicles, such as avoiding multiple occupancy and preventing shared use.

Review vehicle capacity where members of the public are carried (public service vehicles and taxis for example), to ensure that social distancing requirements can be met. Consider the practicalities of providing physical screening to afford additional protection to drivers and passengers where this does not compromise safety.

Allow sufficient time in your planning to reinstate vehicles and associated accessories and attachments (including trailers) that have been taken out of use for a period. Give specific consideration to the supply chain and challenges that might be associated with reinstating a number of vehicles at the same time. This may include the organising of statutory inspections where relevant; maintenance and servicing (availability of spare parts may be an issue); and MOTs.

MOTs should continue to be scheduled for an appropriate time to avoid potential issues, despite the extended period granted during the current pandemic. Specific guidance covering a range of driving and transport related topics can be found at the UK Government website.

Complete and reinstate any inspection, testing and maintenance procedures (including those of a statutory nature). It’s essential that vehicles and associated accessories and attachments are safe before being put back into use especially for safety critical features such as tyres and braking systems which may have been subject to periods of long inactivity.

Ensure emergency procedures remain appropriate and can be fulfilled through your supply chain, including vehicle breakdown and recovery services, tyre and glass replacement services and maintenance and servicing provision, for example.

Consult your insurance broker where you are considering alterations to any vehicles in an attempt to comply with regulations and guidance relevant to social distancing.

You can find specific guidance related to vehicle approvals provided by the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency.

Inspections

Whilst not an exhaustive list, in addition to requirements for maintenance and servicing and MOTs, in-house checks and inspections should include:

 Tyres (including spare wheel and / or space saver for example) – including visual checks for damage, tread depths and checks on tyre pressures

  • Brakes / braking systems
  • Oil and coolant levels
  • Evidence of rodent / other damage within the engine compartment / to wiring
  • Windscreen and other glass (including wiper operation)
  • Dashboard warning lights
  • External lights and indicators
  • Sounders / horns / alarms
  • Seat restraints and seat belts
  • Door and steering lock systems
  • General body work
  • Load restraints, guards, internal racking systems and other equipment, accessories and attachments
  • Other safety features (reversing cameras, autonomous emergency braking, lane departure technology, telematics etc.)
  • Emergency equipment and personal protective equipment (warning triangles, first aid kits, fire extinguisher, torches and high visibility clothing for example). Subject to the regulations and guidance provided by the government and others (see below), other personal protective equipment including gloves and masks or other face coverings may also need to be considered.

Employees

  • Consider methods and timing of communications to employees around re-opening and re-starting procedures and associated expectations. Review existing driving for work policies, driver safety handbooks and associated safe systems of work and risk assessments to ensure these remain relevant and that you are taking all the appropriate measures to provide a safe working environment, safe vehicles and safe drivers.
  • Ensure your employees have the competence and capability for the work activities to be carried out. In checking competence and capability, give consideration to: 
  • Communicating the results of the review of existing driving for work policies, driver safety handbooks and associated safe systems of work and risk assessments, ensuring that specific guidance and instruction has been provided with regard to those additional requirements or changes in operation related to COVID-19.
  • Vehicle familiarisation and other training for returning furloughed commercial drivers and less experienced drivers. Many people will have only driven a private car during their absence, and those that have only recently obtained their driving licences may need additional support.
  • Use of toolbox talks and / or further induction training to formally communicate any changes in policies, procedures, safe systems of work and / or risk assessments. 
  • Highlighting risks associated with vulnerable road users, with an anticipated increase in the number of cyclists and pedestrians if the use of public transport is discouraged. Cyclists and pedestrians may also have become used to lower traffic volumes during the lockdown.
  • Reiterating the risks associated with fatigue, the importance of ensuring regular breaks are taken and the rules specific to driver’s hours (Government) for example. Unloading and loading times may have an additional impact in this regard, particularly where multiple drops are involved.

Sanitisation and cleaning

Ensure suitable arrangements are in place for vehicle cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation, recognising the extensive use of plastics within most vehicles and the numerous touchpoints provided.

Review the need for suitable personal protective equipment for anyone completing such cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation procedures.

Motor trade

Buildings and working practices

Consider the following:

  • Use of signage to highlight social distancing requirements
  • One way pedestrian systems for employee, customer and visitor movement around the premises
  • Physical barriers / screens (at reception areas for example)
  • Controls specific to vehicle sales, retail areas (showrooms, forecourts, auction halls etc.)
  • Removal of touch points where practical (for example, decommissioning of any vending machines previously provided for customer use, removal of vehicle brochures and other publications ( which should be made available electronically if possible)
  • Collection and delivery processes, including social distancing requirements and measures to avoid the need for signature request procedures specific to vehicle collection and delivery, completion of unaccompanied test drives etc.
  • Review arrangements for cleaning and valeting customer and company vehicles.
  • Consider enhanced or reduced cleaning / disinfection / sanitisation options, or possibly removing cleaning and valeting options for customers so as to reduce touch points for employees
  • Undertake a thorough inspection of your site, including all buildings (interior and exterior), forecourt / vehicle display areas and compounds.

Customers

  • Review arrangements for customer bookings (MOT, service and repair) and receiving / returning vehicles, including:
  • Use of a pre-booking and an appointment system where instructions and specific timings are communicated by phone or electronically
  • Designated parking provision
  • Key drop and return procedures (into trays or zip-bags for example)
  • Pre-agreed collection times for customers
  • Electronic only payment transactions
  • Use of disposable seat, steering wheel and floor covers that are removed by the last person to exit the vehicle and which should be safely disposed of 
  • Use of disposable gloves that are changed at regular intervals (post work on individual vehicles and before and after any test drive, for example)
  • Avoiding the need for customers to gain internal access to buildings where possible. If access is required, social distancing rules will apply, with consideration also given to provision of screens to protect employees and visitors

Offices

Employees

If you’ve furloughed staff, you’ll need to consider the timeframe agreed for returning to the workplace, so allow for this in planning arrangements.

Consider the potential impacts of a significant period of time away from work, with some employees likely to benefit from a gradual / phased reintroduction.

Before re-opening, should the first days of re-opening be used to communicate expectations, integrate employees back into their job role and activities, assess any immediate training needs / support, deliver training, deal with maintenance / inspection issues, and the practicalities of managing challenges relating to social and physical distancing?

Is direct contact (phone for example) appropriate, particularly where employees have specific concerns about returning? For example if they live / need regular contact with a vulnerable person.

Advise employees to avoid using public transport if possible, and where use can’t be avoided to comply fully with government regulation and advice, and the advice of the transport operator.

Enhance arrangements to ensure the wellbeing of those working from home is monitored and introduce systems to enable them to stay connected.

Home working

Special considerations for home working include:

Continuing to encourage those employees that can work from home to do so

Reviewing policies and procedures specific to home and lone working, including arrangements for the provision of suitable work stations

Ensuring that IT and cyber security policies and procedures reflect any changes in work arrangements, acknowledging the increased potential for security breaches when individuals are working from home / unsupervised.

Building and working practices

Review existing risk assessments and actions including safe systems of work / working procedures to check they’re relevant to your business’ operation and that you’re taking all the appropriate measures to ensure a safe working environment for your employees, including those that continue to work from home.

New risk assessments should be completed and the results and consequent actions shared with your employees (including any temporary and agency personnel), any visitors, contractors and other occupants or users where premises are shared.

Fire, security, general premises safety, people safety, wellbeing and COVID-19 specific precautions should be included in your review, implementing changes and / or enhancements where necessary to maintain an appropriate level of protection.

Introduce flexible working to facilitate staggered start and finish times and limiting the numbers of people on the premises at any given time.

Discourage car sharing / employees from different households travelling to work together.

Limit the numbers of people permitted to use communal areas, rest rooms and other welfare facilities at any time Work closely and collaboratively with landlords and other occupants in multi-tenure buildings to ensure consistency of approach in common areas.

Change the layout of office space and rest areas to reduce the potential for face-to-face contact, with back-to-back or side-to-side working preferred.

Training

Consider:

  • Requirements for social and physical distancing for example, are likely to impact the practicalities of training delivery, including induction and toolbox talks. Consider this as part of the risk assessment process, including available facilities, numbers that can be safely accommodated, duration, potential barriers to communication etc 
  • Familiarisation (site and plant for example) with returning furloughed employees and operatives potentially not having operated plant or been in a site environment for a significant period of time
  • Conflict resolution / management training to address potential colleague and customer challenges in implementing Covid-19 secure measures

Cleaning and sanitisation

Develop and carry out enhanced workplace cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation programmes. Establish procedures for pre and post re-opening cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation. Areas for particular focus include touch points such as washing facilities, toilet flush and seats, door handles, push plates, hand rails, IT equipment used by employees and vehicles (company car drivers for example).

If possible, provide cleaning stations at entrance and exit points and other strategic locations with signage to remind employees and visitors of the importance of washing hands and hygiene.

Equipment and machinery

Plan sufficient time to recommission previously shutdown machinery / plant and processes in line with all standard operating procedures (SOPs) and manufacturer’s guidelines.

Complete and reinstate any inspection, testing and maintenance procedures including those of a statutory nature that may have lapsed since the shutdown. This could include utility services, machinery / plant (for example passenger lifts and escalators), emergency systems etc.

Property owners

Employees

If you have furloughed staff (caretakers, security, grounds maintenance and / or office personnel, for example) you’ll need to consider the timeframe agreed for bringing them back, so allow for this in your planning arrangements.

Inspection and maintenance

Address maintenance and inspection issues, and the practicalities of managing challenges relating to social and physical distancing. In advance of re-opening / re-occupancy, verify that tenants also have their own arrangements in place.

Undertake a thorough inspection of your site, liaising with appointed managing agents and contractors as appropriate. Require all tenants to complete inspections of the areas they occupy including utility services (see above), machinery / plant / equipment, emergency back-up systems and safety equipment, again to establish and correct any unsafe or abnormal conditions etc.

Complete and reinstate any inspection, testing and maintenance procedures (including those of a statutory nature) that may have lapsed since the shutdown, incorporating utility services, machinery / plant (for example passenger lifts and escalators), emergency systems etc.

Have suitable arrangements for the management of inspections and viewings been considered, recognising the need to comply with regulations and the latest guidance provided by the UK Government and devolved institutions?

Building and working practices

Observe and enforce COVID-19 restrictions in line with government regulations and guidance, with reference to both employees and others (managing agents, tenants, customers and contractors for example) potentially impacted by your activities and including for example those relevant to cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation, welfare provision, social distancing, protective equipment and travel to work.

Review existing risk assessments, safe systems of work / work procedures and actions to ensure these remain relevant to the operation of your business and that you are taking all the appropriate measures to ensure a safe environment for your employees, tenants, appointed managing agents, customers and contractors.

Where you, your managing agents, appointed contractors or tenants business operations and activities have changed, new risk assessments should be completed and the results and consequent actions shared with employees (including any temporary and agency personnel), other tenants, visitors and contractors.

Fire, security, general premises safety (including management of slip, trip and fall risks) and Covid-19 specific precautions should be included in your review, implementing changes and / or enhancements where necessary to maintain an appropriate level of protection.

Can appointed managing agents and / or contractors (maintenance and inspection of buildings, plant and machinery for example) meet your requirements pre and post opening?

Communication

Consider methods and timing of communications with tenants, managing agents, employees and contractors around re-opening, re-starting procedures, inspections and viewings and associated expectations.

Communicate expectations to managing agents, tenants and appointed contractors (utilities, fire safety, water safety, general premises management and cleaning for example), ensuring that where appropriate they have completed a review of their own risk assessments, safe systems of work / work procedures and understand your proposals and plans around re-opening / permitting occupancy.

Any tenants operating in sectors where government regulation and guidance confirms that they should remain closed for the time being, must not be permitted to open.

Cleaning and sanitisation

Establish pre and post re-opening cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation of all customer, visitor facing, staff and communal areas.

Areas for particular focus include touch points such as washing facilities, toilet flush and seats, door handles, push plates, handrails and equipment used by employees (grounds maintenance equipment for example).

Construction

Equipment and machinery

Ensure that competent persons / contractors are appointed to complete inspection, maintenance, servicing, and repair work.

Review safety control arrangements for materials, plant, machinery and equipment procurement - to ensure that measures critical to health and safety can be maintained.

Complete and reinstate any inspection, testing and maintenance procedures, including those of a statutory nature that may have lapsed since the shutdown.

Buildings and site management

Undertake a thorough inspection of your site including all temporary works, structures, site accommodation, machinery, plant and materials, and any hazardous operations. Locate and correct any unsafe or abnormal conditions, such as damage, maintenance issues, leaks, faulty safety and emergency systems, improper housekeeping or storage, signs of vandalism or theft, water damage etc.

Review existing project and site management plans to check they are relevant to the operation of the site and your activities, and you are taking all the appropriate measures to ensure a safe working environment.

This includes:

  • Construction phase
  • Fire safety
  • Water damage
  • Traffic
  • Waste
  • Security
  • Own method statements and risk assessments (whether you are a principal contractor or subcontractor)

Where site operations and control measures need to change, plans should be updated and careful consideration given to:

Whether new method statements and risk assessments require completion. If so, formally share the results and consequent actions with your own employees (including any temporary and agency personnel), subcontractors, essential visitors, and where appropriate, your client.

Whether fire, water damage, security, and COVID-19 specific precautions are in your review, implementing changes and / or enhancements where necessary to maintain an appropriate level of protection. 

If you are the appointed principal contractor for the project, ensure that you source updated risk assessments and method statements from your appointed subcontractors and review these to establish that they are suitable and sufficient. Ensure that subcontractors are aware of your expectations specific to the maintenance of a safe working environment.

If subcontractors are involved, review existing pre-qualification requirements to establish the measures they are taking specific to assessing and controlling the risks associated with Covid-19; also check the associated communication and training they are providing to their own employees / operatives under their control.

Consider staggered start and finish times and whether additional entrance/ exit points are required to reduce site traffic.

Employees

Consider methods and timing of communications to employees, operatives and subcontractors with regard to re-opening and re-starting procedures and associated expectations and proposed site rules.

Ensure work competence and capability of all employees, subcontractors, temporary workers and agency personnel for the activities to be carried out.

Check all possess the necessary and appropriate skills and have received appropriate information, instruction and training, and hold the correct up to date certificates, and licenses, where required.

Additional training programmes and / or certification, instruction, information and supervision may be required, where there is an insufficient number of competent personnel with regard to your 'return-to-work-policy' (where in place).

Sanitisation and cleaning

Carry out enhanced cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation regimes covering the workplace in its entirety, both pre and post re-opening. Pay special attention to communal areas and company vehicles.

Retail

Deliveries and vehicles

Consider:

  • The need for careful and clear communication with suppliers specific to goods-in delivery arrangements, including timings, avoiding contact and arrangements for social distancing
  • Scheduling goods-in deliveries to avoid the potential for overcrowding in deliveries areas and interaction with customers
  • Considering the potential for non-contact goods-in deliveries
  • Limiting those involved in loading and unloading, and where more than one person is needed, using the same pairs
  • Establishing safe working procedures for customer deliveries and / or click and collect services, where offered, considering relevant online ordering, social distancing, protective equipment, face coverings, cleaning, disinfection, sanitisation (including vehicles) and hygiene. Additional information specific to managing your vehicle fleet can be found on our re-starting guidance for fleets
  • Providing adequate and suitable welfare facilities for employees and visiting drivers, including areas for safely changing and storing clothing and personal protective equipment (where overalls and other personal protective equipment provided, laundry arrangements and provision should be specifically reviewed).

Customers

  • Specific considerations may include:
  • Reviewing opening / closing procedures including designated time slots for more vulnerable customers
  • Online booking of time slots for customers to shop at your premises
  • Limiting the number of entry and exit points, and having separate entry and exit points if possible
  • Limiting the number of customers allowed within the premises at any time
  • Providing a customer facing social distancing coordinator near entry points to highlight the social distancing requirements and control the numbers entering the premises at any one time. It may be appropriate for this coordinator to have a security remit and be SIA registered
  • Providing clear signage outside and inside of the premises to explain the social distancing measures that customers should follow
  • Limiting customer contact with merchandise where practical, for example using protected displays and signage to remind customers of the implications of picking up and putting down merchandise (only touch what you intend to purchase signage for example)
  • Providing markings and signage to assist with queue spacing requirements both inside and outside of the premises, taking into account traffic management and pedestrian segregation
  • Encouraging customers to shop / attend the premises alone, if practical
  • Providing appropriately marked one-way systems to help maintain social distancing
  • Making regular in-store announcements reminding customers of social distancing and hygiene expectations
  • Encouraging cashless purchase
  • Using tools such as social media, websites and apps to inform customers of policies and procedures relevant to social distancing, hygiene etc., including specific reference to any of the usual services not available
  • Providing a no-contact returns procedure
  • Encouraging drivers to stay in their vehicles where this doesn’t compromise their safety and existing safe working practice (e.g. prevention of drive-aways)

Buildings and working practices

Consider:

  • Liaising with nearby / proximate premises to assist with possible shared parking and queue spacing areas
  • Installing physical barriers / screens at till / checkout etc. areas. Barriers must be subject to appropriate cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation
  • Closing some till / checkout points to assist with social distancing, this being particularly relevant where till / checkout points are close together
  • Limiting numbers (to one at a time) using lifts and limiting escalator use
  • Re-stocking outside of operating hours to reduce congestion within retail / sales areas
  • Removing promotional stands to reduce the potential for customers accumulating in specific areas
  • Closing changing room areas unless you can have an employee oversee social distancing arrangements
  • Removing customer seating
  • Removing or closing (should be cornered off) any children’s play equipment, play areas or crèche areas for example
  • Stopping any other services where direct interaction could be a feature, for example nail-bars, make-up application, personnel shoppers, packing etc
  • Closing cafés and restaurants subject to the provision of additional guidance and advice from government and other relevant trade bodies
  • Ensuring regular rotation of high-touch stock / merchandise
  • Establishing pick-up and drop-off collection points to reduce the need to pass products from hand-to-hand
  • Removing/ restricting of touch points in staff areas where practical i.e. vending machines and other canteen equipment for general employee use
  • Establishing procedures and safe systems of work specific to machinery interventions such as cleaning, servicing, maintenance and repair
  • Continued support (practical and well-being) for any employees who continue to work from home

Cleaning

Consider providing cleaning stations at entrance and exit points and other strategic locations with signage to remind customers and employees of the importance of washing hands and hygiene.

Establish cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation procedures for trolleys and baskets used by customers, and trolleys / cages used by employees for carrying stock.

Ensure regular cleaning of touch points including door handles, lift buttons, keypads, stair and escalator handrails etc.

Logistics

Buildings and working practices

Consider the following in your review:

  • Fire and intruder alarm protection, CCTV, access control coverage and guarding provision
  • The adequacy of arrangements for social / physical distancing e.g. improved signage, physical barriers (if considered appropriate) and personal protective equipment provision
  • Establishing procedures and safe systems of work specific to machinery interventions such as cleaning, servicing, maintenance and repair
  • Providing cleaning stations at entrance and exit points and other strategic locations, with signage to remind customers and employees of the importance of washing hands and hygiene
  • Providing adequate and suitable welfare facilities for employees and visiting drivers, including areas for safely changing and storing clothing and personal protective equipment (where overalls and other personal protective equipment are provided, laundry arrangements and provision should be specifically reviewed); enabling drivers to access welfare facilities when required, consistent with other guidance
  • Regulating use of high traffic areas including corridors, lifts, turnstiles and walkways to maintain social-distancing; this may include appropriately marked one-way systems to help maintain social distancing 
  • Reviewing entry and exit routes for visitors and contractors to minimise contact with other people; defining process alternatives for entry and exit points where appropriate, for example, deactivating pass readers at turnstiles in favour of showing a pass to security personnel at a distance
  • Determining if schedules for essential services and contractor visits can be revised to reduce interaction and overlap between people, for example, carrying out services at night
  • Consider the continued adequacy of sprinkler and other fire protection if increased levels of storage occur
  • Where possible and safe, having single workers load or unload vehicles
  • Encouraging visits via remote connection or remote working for visitors where this is an option
  • Limiting the number of visitors at any one time; establishing host responsibilities relating to Covid-19, providing any necessary training for people who act as hosts for visitors
  • Providing clear guidance on social distancing and hygiene for inbound drivers or safety critical visitors both before and upon arrival. For example, advance information via phone, website or email, plus signage and visual aids on site
  • Reducing movement by discouraging non-essential trips within buildings and sites, for example, restricting access to some areas, encouraging use of radios or telephones where permitted, and cleaning them between use
  • Coordinating and cooperating with other occupiers for those working in facilities shared with other businesses, including with landlords and other tenants
  • Continued support (practical and well-being) for any employees who continue to work from home.

Inspections

Consider:

  • Methods to reduce frequency of deliveries, for example, by ordering larger quantities less often or larger stock deliveries in / out of storage premises to reduce visits.
  • Encouraging drivers to stay in their vehicles where this does not compromise their safety and existing safe working practice, such as preventing drive-aways.
  • Considering the potential for non-contact goods-in deliveries.

Manufacturing

Buildings and working practices

Undertake a thorough inspection of your site, including all buildings (interior and exterior), boundary fences, and gates

Check fire and intruder alarm protection, CCTV, access control coverage and guarding provisions

Consider removal or restriction of touch points where practical, such as vending machines and other canteen equipment for general employee use

Check adequate and suitable welfare facilities are available, including areas for safely changing and storing clothing and personal protective equipment. Where overalls and other personal protective equipment are provided, review laundry arrangements.

Check the adequacy of arrangements for social distancing to avoid close working, including the use of vehicles and plant, machinery and equipment; careful management of meetings and training delivery; improved signage, physical barriers and use of personal protective equipment.

Review IT and cyber security processes and procedures.

Equipment and machinery

Undertake a thorough inspection of utility services (including water systems and any other potential sources of legionella, such as cooling towers, evaporating condensers and power facilities for production equipment), machinery and plant, storage arrangements, any hazardous operations, emergency back-up systems and safety equipment.

Check for and correct any unsafe or abnormal conditions, such as damage, maintenance issues, leaks, faulty safety and emergency systems, improper housekeeping or storage, signs of vandalism or theft. Our equipment checklist may assist you.

Review procedures and safe systems of work specific to machinery interventions, such as cleaning, servicing, maintenance and repair. Allow sufficient time in your planning to recommission previously shut down machinery and plant in line with all standard operating procedures (SOPs) and manufacturers’ guidelines.

Complete and reinstate any inspection, testing and maintenance procedures (including those of a statutory nature) that may have lapsed since the shutdown.

This includes utility services (both for the buildings and production needs), machinery and plant (for example, air receivers and compressors, vehicle lifting equipment and forklift trucks), emergency systems, vehicles etc. 

Check machinery guarding and interventions, adequacy and safety of storage racking, emissions control equipment, noise control equipment, process related safety equipment (relating to prevention of fire / explosion for instance), pollutants control, other waste management plant, control equipment for hazardous substances etc.

Employees

Review support (practical and well-being) for any employees who continue to work from home.

Ensure your employees have the competence and capability for the work activities to be carried out, through the necessary skills, training and licensing requirements.

Additional employee training programmes and / or certification, instruction, information and supervision may be required, where there is an insufficient number of competent employees, or where new processes, machinery and plant require new skill sets.

Refer to your “return-to-work-policy” (where in place), as this will provide structure to ensuring your employees are ‘fit for work’, with mental health and well-being considered, in addition to physical fitness.

Sanitisation and cleaning

Carry out enhanced cleaning, disinfection and sanitisation regimes covering the workplace in its entirety, both pre and post re-opening.

Include company vehicles, forklift trucks, pallet trucks etc. in your cleaning regime, and ensure this is recorded and covers on-going expectations / requirements.

As well as updating fire risk assessments to keep your premises and people safe, ensure storage and use of any alcohol-based, flammable sanitisers is clear of ignition sources (for example, electrical equipment, hot surfaces, smoking areas etc.) and ideally store them within purpose designed flammable liquid cabinets, or otherwise, steel cabinets.

Training

Requirements around social and physical distancing are likely to impact the practicalities of training delivery, including induction and toolbox talks.

This should be considered as part of the risk assessment process, including available facilities, numbers that can be safely accommodated, duration, and potential barriers to communication.

In reviewing training arrangements and competency requirements, give specific consideration to the availability and responsibilities of key personnel, including:

  • Senior managers
  • Human Resources and Health, Safety & Environmental personnel
  • Department managers / supervisors
  • Appropriately qualified technicians and plant / machinery operators 
  • Maintenance personnel
  • First aiders
  • Fire marshals

Business insurance from Towergate

Aside from advising on all aspects of business insurance and risk management, we offer specialist policies for organisations in a range of sectors, from energy and offshore to sky diving and martial arts.

See our range of business insurance specialisms.


The information contained in this bulletin is based on sources that we believe are reliable and should be understood as general risk management and insurance information only. It is not intended to be taken as advice with respect to any specific or individual situation and cannot be relied upon as such. If you wish to discuss your specific requirements, please do not hesitate to contact your usual Towergate Insurance Brokers advisor.